Parents are Role Models for Teen Drivers

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Parents play a critical role in influencing teen driving behavior. Teens who report their parents are not good driving role models are more than twice as likely to be involved in an accident.

Accidents. Twenty-four percent of teens who report their parents are not good driving role models have been in more than one accident as a driver, compared to 10 percent of teens who report their parents are good role models as drivers.

Tickets. Fifteen percent of teens who report their parents are not good role models as drivers have been issued more than one ticket (speeding or other moving violation), compared to six percent of teens who report their parents are good role models as drivers.

Disconnect Over Top Driving Concerns

The survey found that parents and teens do not always see eye-to-eye when it comes to certain driving-related risks. Among the largest disconnects:

  • Driving under the influence. Sixty-six percent of teens are concerned about driving under the influence of alcohol, compared to 14 percent of parents.
  • Distracted driving (mobile/smartphone). Fifty-six percent of teens are concerned about distracted driving as a result of mobile/smartphones, versus 35 percent of parents.
  • Staying aware of other drivers on the road. Fifty-two percent of teens are concerned about staying aware of other drivers on the road, compared to 31 percent of parents.

“The Talk”

Ninety-eight percent of parents report they have had conversations about safe driving with their teen drivers, while 96 percent of teens report they have had conversations.

Reaching Teens at a Younger Age

Younger teens are more receptive to safe driving conversations than older teens. Among those who have not had a safe driving conversation with parents:

Sixty-seven percent of 16-year-olds would like to have the conversation, compared to 29 percent of 18-year-olds.

Of that 67 percent, half are waiting for their parents to initiate the conversation.

 

Source: Travelers